Richmond Vale

Tree of the Week: Mango (Mangifera indica)

  [caption id="attachment_7144" align="alignleft" width="300"] Juicy, sweet and yummy Mango! Juicy, sweet, yummy! Mango is a treat to people all over the world and Vincentians are no different. One good friend to Richmond Vale Academy (RVA) told us about how, when he was a boy, he and his friends would get out of school and race down to the nearest mango tree to collect the good fruit before it was gone. When it is in season here in Saint Vincent (SVG), one is hard-pressed to find a fruit that is more popular than the mango. The mango tree is a member of the Evergreen family. Then, it can grow to be up to 90 feet tall. Its leaves are about 12-16 inches in length when they are mature and are leathery, glossy and dark green in color. The fruit has a smooth, tough outside layer and fleshy, juicy inside layer that is very sweet. It can vary in size, shape and flavor depending on the variety and weighs anywhere between ¼ of a pound and 3 pounds. The fruit tree was introduced to the Caribbean in the late 1600s from the India-Burma region of the world. In the earlier days of mango cultivation in Saint Vincent. Much of the land near the sea was occupied by British estates and plantations. It was common for people to go...
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Richmond Vale

Wonderland Indeed (Bio Diversity)

WONDERLAND INDEED By Vanessa Lindersvold. Climate Activist 2016. https://youtu.be/42HXhKvwIr4 I have no words to describe such an amazing experience since long ago I always want to do something like that but I just thought it was expensive and I left it for a future moment. as we use to do with many things in our life. Then you realize you have We use to do with many things in our life. Then you realize your life purchasing stuff that you can´t even remember and let your money (and your time with it). Running out of your hands for something that just bring you a fast trivial sense of happiness that flew away after the next shopping experience. Everything aiming to destroy this awesome planet we live in and that we should protect. Everything aiming to destroy this awesome planet we live in and that we should protect. One-third of the deep coral reef has disappeared already. Deep reefs are carbonated structures and its presence favors a high diversity around as they are many different marine organisms. Corals prevent beach erosion, capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere and fix it in their skeletons.This process makes reef sites permanent sequestration of atmospheric carbon, thus, allows the stability of different ecosystems as well, its lost therefore is causing disturbances in the natural This process makes reef sites permanent...
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