donate to victim from volcano eruption st vincent

  • Slide 1

    Welcome to Richmond Vale
    Academy

    Fires, floods, hurricanes, droughts and extinctions are telling us that we need a new economic model to protecting the planet.
  • Slide 3

    What comes together comes best

    Alone the world changes you, together we change the world.
  • Slide 3

    Learning by doing

    Each student and the student body, become able to act with others in the present reality.
  • Slide 1

    Welcome to Richmond Vale
    Academy

    Fires, floods, hurricanes, droughts and extinctions are telling us that we need a new economic model to protecting the planet.
  • Slide 3

    What comes together comes best

    Alone the world changes you, together we change the world.
  • Slide 3

    Learning by doing

    Each student and the student body, become able to act with others in the present reality.

Richmond Vale Academy, St. Vincent and the Grenadines  

Richmond Vale Academy is an educational institution with the aim to train activists from all over the world to fight global warming and global poverty where it is most needed.  

JOIN ONE OF OUR PROGRAMS

Fighting Poverty Program - 10 Months

Fighting Poverty Program - 10 Months

The Fighting Poverty program addresses poverty in a practical approach. Participants train in the Caribbean and serve poor communities in Latin America. New Poverty Fighters Start every April and October. Read more and join us for this amazing experience!. Click here to learn more

Climate Change Activist – 6 Months

Climate Change Activist – 6 Months

Learn, Teach and DO together with your team and members of the community to reach this amazing goal of making our small nation of St. Vincent and Grenadines, one of the first countries in the world to be ready for the Climate. Click here to learn more

THEY ALREADY GOT INVOLVED

  • Dr. Thompson, St. Vincent

    Here in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, we are attempting to become a green island, looking at energy, at the way we conserve our environment. I believe Richmond Vale Academy is one of those places where you can get the information and education and certified programs in terms of what you really need to know about helping to save this world, our planet."

  • Shiyene, St. Vincent

    Community living made me feel like I belong somewhere - Also because everyone is passionate. We are conscious about how we best can help each other and the community as well. Living in RVA was good because I had to clean, going to the garden and being in the kitchen. I got to meet new people and have them teach me to acquire knowledge and competence; also teaching me how to live more sustainable. I learned a lot about biogas, climate change and gardening.

  • Demion, St. Vincent

    Before RVA's public awareness campaign, many Vincentians did not know what permaculture was. Dreams of getting gold in a global treelympics were farfetched and plastic bottles were an environmental menace. Organic food, GMO awareness and so on were not highly extent. Through RVA's intervention with its 2012 -2021 Climate Compliance agenda, SVG is now a different nation with a more positive environmental attitude."

load more hold SHIFT key to load all load all

FROM OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL

Small Farmers Feed the World - Pass-it-On Sustainable Home Gardens

CFLI - Growing Climate Change Adaptation Capacity in St. Vincent

The Pass-It-On Sustainable Home Garden and how to make one!

Ecological Farming with the PDC Course 2020 - UK Friends of MCT

RVA Ecological Farming Model Garden

Mangrove Planting - St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Click the "YOUTUBE BUTTON" to Subscribe! >>

Seeing St. Vincent through children’s eyes

childs-eyes-front
We keep hearing that as adults we are nowhere as creative as when we were children and, what's worse, that the older we get the less creative we become. My point, however, is not to discuss the broad topic of 'creativity' and whether formal education system diminishes it or not. What I want to share with you is my impressions from one project, a small-scale experiment, that I carried out in St. Vincent island which involved creativity. 


Although I am not a writer (I prefer to describe the world using images) I hope you will find this piece to read interesting.
This idea was born in my head even before I had come to St. Vincent and it was based on the following circumstances:
No 1. I had a mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera which was still in a good condition but I no longer used it.
No 2. I was curious to learn about a country that I know little about, about everyday lives of people living there through photos taken by them.
I thought including non-formal education photography activities into formal education could work well. Therefore, I introduced the idea to Ms Richards, the principal of a primary school in Fitz Hughes village, and after receiving her 'yes', I would come to school every week or two weeks to have photography lessons with 6th grade students (11 y.o.). Between late December 2017 and March 2018 I would meet with them around 8 times. Over the course of the project 13 students (Kayann-Jay, Swer, Kenran, Shamorra, Shakime, Akeela, Tamika, Oran, Glenson, Malique, Aison, Mary and Kishron ) attended theory lessons and practical exercises, which helped them feel more confident about working with a semi-professional camera. 


By participating in lessons they were able to learn the basics of photography (composition, light, the rule of thirds...), learn about different camera settings as well as they were encouraged to spend their free time in a creative way. After a few lessons, once the excitement of playing with a new toy subsided, we made a list according to which each student was assigned a day and was able to take the camera home with them on this given day.
Things went fairly smoothly. Kids co-operated well and camera was being passed from hands to hands according to the list, with some rather funny issues such as some students keeping the camera for longer than we agreed and other students telling on them the very moment I would show up in school ("Miss, miss, Kishron kept the camera for 5 days!" – he was supposed to keep it for a day or two). Another funny moment that I recall was when almost at the end of the project, right before I was going to print the 14 selected photos and after I would mention virtually each time during previous lessons that the print-outs will be shown at the final exhibition, one boy (rather shy), came up to me and quietly asked: "Miss, what is an exhibition?".
I must admit each time I went to school to check on the project and to collect the latest pictures, I would feel truly excited to see which scenes from their everyday lives my Vincy students managed to capture with the camera. They did surprise me a couple of times and I could see some having strong interest in a particular type of photography, such as macro or portraits.
After all lessons and after each student was able to keep the camera for long enough to take photos, there were 14 best pictures selected out of all, one from every student (in one case 2 from the same student). The authors had to come up with captions to their own photos.
The print-outs were exhibited in Richmond Vale Academy's main hall. We organized the final event at the beginning of April 2018 and my 6th graders together with their teacher, Mr Franklin, were invited to come to the exhibition. We asked them to find on the wall their picture and to say a few words about it to staff, students and volunteers at Richmond Vale Academy. Before the final event every child could also choose one photo they took and particularly liked (not necessarily the one exhibited) which was then printed, framed and given to them as presents during the event.
At the exhibition all the children looked happy and proud, and from what some of them told me, they really enjoyed participating in the project and having their pictures printed. I hope this photo experiment left a sparkle of creativity in each of them and who knows maybe some will consider becoming a professional photographer in the future…
Malwina Sedzikowska, Poland, November'17 team and EU Aid Volunteer
Thanks to RVA management (especially Else Marie) and November'17 team (especially Dani, Natalia, Tessa, Paula, Maya also Marco and Glenn) for ideas, support and making it possible.

How an island got it's name
Building weekend in the mountain
 

RVA BLOG

Hi everyone at RVA and all the Vincentians I worked with. It is been a while, life went on, there is not a single week I am not thinking of St Vincent. The reason I took so long to send a letter is because I have quit using social media for at least ...
Pat has been part of the Richmond Vale Academy tree planting process. He has received some assistance from time to time since 2015 to establish his own orchard on his 3.6 acre farm, on which he grows a variety of trees, some of which are for commerci...
Chatoyer Garden's ecological farm is located up Maloney, nestled high up in the lush, verdant mountains of Vermont. Named after Chief Joseph Chatoyer, the National hero of St. Vincent and the Grenadines; honored for his resistance against the colonia...
“Permaculture is an ethical design science that mimics nature to supply all our human needs, whilst benefiting the environment,” Geof Lawton.  Permaculture is an evolution of consciousness, a journey that improves not only our relationship ...
“The experience was wonderful. I got to learn a lot from the inmates while at the same time they also learnt from me. I gained a lot of respect and trust from them during my time there. They became like family because we interacted while learning at ...
The government of St Vincent and Grenadines has committed itself to ensuring the country is food secure during the difficult period of handling the adverse impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.The country has experienced food security challenges which are...